LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 94

Thread: Steep Drops

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Brick Township, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    686
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by ragdolling View Post
    This is a great thread - lots of good stuff. It was good to see frankshred's comment a few comments above, because that's always really helped me, leaning a bit on the inside rail. Not sure if this is technically the best way to do it, and no one ever told or taught me this - I just one day started trying to replicate the feel of snowboarding, when you're in a half pipe or a steep section of hill and you need to lean and keep that uphill edge.

    I'd be curious to hear from others about whether this is considered a good way to go about it.

    i usually do that with a steep backside drop-in, not so much frontside

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Wildwood ,Nj
    Posts
    2,992
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Aguaholic View Post
    On fast, steep, hollow waves...there is no reason to paddle hard or even kick for that matter. Just a simple 1,2 and up will do it. Late drops are where it's at. Until you can do a late drop...you are missing a very valuable part of surfing. Mush burgers can require the paddle from hell and kicking like you got a great white behind you.

    But you absolutly don't need to paddle like a psyco for fast hollow waves...maybe thats what you are doing wrong?
    I never understood Kicking to catch a wave when riding a shortboard. I see all these people and gromets doing it but does it really help??? I never kick my feet and I have no issue catching waves?

  3. #43

    confidence

    Simply, and excuse my french, you just need to grow a set. Thats the difference between surfers and bad ones, how hard they charge. You can only take but so many poundings before you find a way in, its human nature.

    Its amazing what you get away with on a surfboard if you just go for it.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Long Branch
    Posts
    368
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by MATT JOHNSON View Post
    I never understood Kicking to catch a wave when riding a shortboard. I see all these people and gromets doing it but does it really help??? I never kick my feet and I have no issue catching waves?
    I find that when you kick your feet it helps you get into a wave because it helps you distribute more weight to your chest

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Wildwood ,Nj
    Posts
    2,992
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by darippah View Post
    I find that when you kick your feet it helps you get into a wave because it helps you distribute more weight to your chest
    I dont know I tried to kick but it help I just found to throw off my timing . Its probally cause I just always paddled without kicking

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    Simply, and excuse my french, you just need to grow a set. Thats the difference between surfers and bad ones, how hard they charge. You can only take but so many poundings before you find a way in, its human nature.

    Its amazing what you get away with on a surfboard if you just go for it.


    This. Surfing steep, hollow stuff requires the least amount of paddling in my opinion. 3 hard paddles will get you in it. Its all about the lineup, and big cajones. If your scared it aint gonna work. Get lined up, turn toward the shore at the correct angle (slight) whether your going left or right... you have to go at atleast a slight angle unless you wanna ride straight down the damn thing and have the lip break off the back of your board. Or worse yet, try to make a bottom turn and get clobbered by the lip. Paddle a hard 3 strokes and pop up... knees bent. Dont try to do nothing fancy. Just let the beast do what it wants to. Dont be scared to eat sand and eat a board or two. Its gonna happen. I usually go try to play with the steep stuff for a while until I eat it two or three good times then I go to a much easier break, usually not too far down the road.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Milford, DE
    Posts
    153
    Images
    40
    Originally Posted by MATT JOHNSON
    I never understood Kicking to catch a wave when riding a shortboard. I see all these people and gromets doing it but does it really help??? I never kick my feet and I have no issue catching waves?



    I read a report a while back on kicking your feet while catching a wave, which was written by a pro surfer. I can't seem to find it, but stated that it does nothing to help you catch a wave.
    I always kick my legs when paddling for a wave; I guess it's just instincts. Then again, I use to bodyboard before surfing.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Long Branch
    Posts
    368
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by MATT JOHNSON View Post
    I dont know I tried to kick but it help I just found to throw off my timing . Its probally cause I just always paddled without kicking
    I think it only works with a shortboard

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North Wildwood ,Nj
    Posts
    2,992
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by darippah View Post
    I think it only works with a shortboard
    thats what I was refering to when I ride my shortboard. I think its that I have ridden logs for most of my life that I have trained myself over the years without knowing it to only paddle and not kick my feet.

    Guess I am gonna have to try to kick more

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    Simply, and excuse my french, you just need to grow a set. Thats the difference between surfers and bad ones, how hard they charge. You can only take but so many poundings before you find a way in, its human nature.

    Its amazing what you get away with on a surfboard if you just go for it.
    Well said. You're not going to suddenly "do it right" and say "Wow, why didn't I think of that earlier?!" Well, maybe you will, but I've seen a lot of people learn to surf, and I've never seen that happen. Just go out there and eat sand, again and again and again. If you're thinking "how do I take off on this wave?" you're already thinking too much. Just do it. I know that probably sounds like an over-simplification, but it's really not. Paddle like you're having a seizure and just go for it. Don't give up, just eat more sand, and eventually you will transition from only being able to take off on the mushy ones. The best way to do this is to surf in as many different conditions as possible. Surf the big hollow days, surf the knee high days, everything. I would HIGHLY recommend taking a surf trip to somewhere with quality, consistent (but not huge) waves. Don't do it until you can catch the semi-mushy chest high waves and not fall. Otherwise it might be a waste of money. In my opinion, it's still a great time. I went on my first "surf trip" to Costa Rica with some college buddies before I could even stand up consistently, but the whole experience got me amped enough to stay motivated through the rest of the learning curve. Costa Rica is a good option. It's safe, cheap, pretty good year round, and has lots of options. You'll eventually figure it out if you just surf the right coast, but it might take a while. We only get so many chest-shoulder high days, and that's what you really want for learning. Cali is great too. If you're ready to invest in a wetsuit, head up to Santa Cruz in November/December. Amazing waves of all kinds, great for improving your surfing without all the hassle of dealing with passports/customs.