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Thread: 96hr kast

  1. #1

    96hr kast

    Attack uv thu F*ckin' lowz! 96hr radiofax! this iz 1st thing NEXT WEEK! not this weekend! woot.

  2. #2
    u know when they say "imagine how much rain this would amount to?" during heavy snowfall meltdownz? well here'z a good X-ample...


    Flood Watch for Southwest Suffolk, NY
    from 2 am EDT, Thu., Sep. 30, 2010 until 2 am EDT, Sat., Oct. 2, 2010
    Local Radar MapWhat's This?
    Updated 29 Sept 2010 7:20 pm Local Time
    Enlarge Map | Weather in Motion®

    Get WeatherReady

    What to Do During a Flood
    After the Flood
    Home Cleanup Tips
    Facts About Flooding
    Video: WeatherReady Safety & Preparation
    Issued by The National Weather Service
    New York City, NY
    4:01 pm EDT, Wed., Sep. 29, 2010

    ... FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 2 AM EDT THURSDAY THROUGH LATE FRIDAY NIGHT...

    THE FLOOD WATCH CONTINUES FOR

    * PORTIONS OF SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT... NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY AND SOUTHEAST NEW YORK... INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING AREAS... IN SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT... NORTHERN FAIRFIELD... NORTHERN MIDDLESEX... NORTHERN NEW HAVEN... SOUTHERN FAIRFIELD... SOUTHERN MIDDLESEX AND SOUTHERN NEW HAVEN. IN NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY... BERGEN... EASTERN PASSAIC... ESSEX... HUDSON... UNION AND WESTERN PASSAIC. IN SOUTHEAST NEW YORK... BRONX... KINGS (BROOKLYN)... NASSAU... NEW YORK (MANHATTAN)... NORTHERN WESTCHESTER... NORTHWESTERN SUFFOLK... ORANGE... PUTNAM... QUEENS... RICHMOND (STATEN ISLAND)... ROCKLAND... SOUTHERN WESTCHESTER AND SOUTHWESTERN SUFFOLK.

    * FROM 2 AM EDT THURSDAY THROUGH LATE FRIDAY NIGHT

    * LOW PRESSURE WILL TRACK NORTH ALONG THE COAST AND INTERACT WITH A STALLED FRONTAL BOUNDARY THURSDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHT. A STRONG SOUTHERLY FLOW WILL TRANSPORT TROPICAL MOISTURE NORTHWARD ALONG WITH THE LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM... RESULTING IN THE POTENTIAL FOR VERY HEAVY RAIN.

    * RAINFALL TOTALS OF 4 TO 6 INCHES ARE POSSIBLE WHERE THE HEAVIEST BANDS SET UP... WITH LOCALLY HIGHER AMOUNTS POSSIBLE... MAINLY ACROSS NORTHEASTERN NEW JERSEY. THIS WILL RESULT IN SHARP RISES OF FAST RESPONDING RIVERS AND STREAMS. IN ADDITION... THE INTENSE RAINFALL RATES WILL LEAD TO POSSIBLE FLASH FLOODING ESPECIALLY IN URBAN AREAS.

    PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

    A FLOOD WATCH MEANS THERE IS A POTENTIAL FOR FLOODING BASED ON CURRENT FORECASTS. YOU SHOULD MONITOR LATER FORECASTS AND BE ALERT FOR POSSIBLE FLOOD WARNINGS. THOSE LIVING IN AREAS PRONE TO FLOODING SHOULD BE PREPARED TO TAKE ACTION SHOULD FLOODING DEVELOP.

    &&
    Last edited by kman; Sep 29, 2010 at 11:31 PM.

  3. #3
    Wait, you saying we're gonna have good surf early next week too?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    boom. i like it. By the way, isn't it usually 12" of snow for every inch of rain (depending on the temperature)?

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Location
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    if this was a month ago in the summer, the amount of hype would be out of control. weather reports are just like, 'oh, it's going to rain a lot!'

    crazy

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    New York
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    it looks f^(*!#g righteous to me! These lowz are going to light it up for a couples of days!!

  7. #7
    I need to learn how to read this ****......YouTube, here I come

  8. #8
    Rayn is gud 4 SuRf

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    those maps kman posts are horrible, i kind of wish you would you stop posting them, or at least resize them so it doesn't widen the page.

    Having multiple lows doesn't really mean anything. It is just an elongated frontal system since it is picking up the remnants of tropical storm Nicole.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Long Island
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    20
    Quote Originally Posted by beaner View Post
    boom. i like it. By the way, isn't it usually 12" of snow for every inch of rain (depending on the temperature)?
    The average is roughly 10" of snow for every 1" of liquid when the temperatures around between 28 and 34. The lower the temp, the higher the snow ratio. (20-27 degrees yields a 15:1 ratio)