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  1. #1
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    Could this be a beach replenishment that will be in the favor of surfing


  2. #2
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    I don't know

    I dunno...the common theme with sand movement seems to be complete uncertainty with the results. The ocean overpowers anything we try to do, and our actions might have effects that no one anticipates. Take the Superbank, for instance. Few people would have opposed the Tweed River project, had they known it would create one of the best spots in Queensland.I could see this going in lots of different directions. The Atlantic is so chaotic...everything in the mid-Atlantic seems to end with the same result: lots and lots of straight sand beaches with any variation soon wiped out by the longshore currents.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MATT JOHNSON View Post
    I dont really see the connection to surfing in this situation but the kind of stuff in this article is going on elsewhere as well....LOTS of public funding going into replenishing beachs that are for all intents and purposes private. Either filling beaches that are outright privately owned, or filling beaches where the beach is publicly owned, but public access is severely limited.

    IMO the connection between beach nourishment and surfing, is using grain size. The medium-coarse grain sized sand that engineers like to use for these projects because it holds up well, tends to result in shorebreak. The lefts breaking off the groins (Grant, Broadway, etc) in Cape May is a good example of spots that i'm sure you are familiar with that have been really negatively affected by filling the beach with coarse sand in the area since the late 1980s. Tends to get steep and deep right off the beach, but didnt use to and wouldnt if they would just fill it with medium-fine grain sand.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitchell View Post
    I dont really see the connection to surfing in this situation but the kind of stuff in this article is going on elsewhere as well....LOTS of public funding going into replenishing beachs that are for all intents and purposes private. Either filling beaches that are outright privately owned, or filling beaches where the beach is publicly owned, but public access is severely limited.

    IMO the connection between beach nourishment and surfing, is using grain size. The medium-coarse grain sized sand that engineers like to use for these projects because it holds up well, tends to result in shorebreak. The lefts breaking off the groins (Grant, Broadway, etc) in Cape May is a good example of spots that i'm sure you are familiar with that have been really negatively affected by filling the beach with coarse sand in the area since the late 1980s. Tends to get steep and deep right off the beach, but didnt use to and wouldnt if they would just fill it with medium-fine grain sand.

    they are taking sand out of the coveis what I am getting at. If you off the rocks at high tide your in chest deep water. Since they put sand there a while back it hasnt broke like it use too. and the place never gets over chest high anymore. I think if they take sand from there and move it to where they are gonna it will make that place break line it use to 10 years ago. that place use to produce some of the longest lefts in snj at one time

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MATT JOHNSON View Post
    they are taking sand out of the coveis what I am getting at. If you off the rocks at high tide your in chest deep water. Since they put sand there a while back it hasnt broke like it use too. and the place never gets over chest high anymore. I think if they take sand from there and move it to where they are gonna it will make that place break line it use to 10 years ago. that place use to produce some of the longest lefts in snj at one time
    Matt: This is just a poorly written article. trust me they arent going to be taking any sand OFF the beach at the Cove they are putting more sand ON the Cove beach.
    "The local share of the upcoming project, which includes pumping 320,000 cubic yards of sand from The Cove Beach in Cape May to Saint Peter's Beach in Cape May Point, will only be 8.75 percent of overall costs expected to exceed $5 million."

    The word 'from" means the stretch of beach that is GETTING sand. FROM the Cove to Saint Peters is GETTING sand.

    Either way, i dont expect it to hurt things at the Cove. That place is beyond hope. Except today..my god with HH SE swell and N winds that place must have been at least working today.
    Last edited by mitchell; Oct 1, 2010 at 11:28 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitchell View Post
    Matt: This is just a poorly written article. trust me they arent going to be taking any sand OFF the beach at the Cove they are putting more sand ON the Cove beach.
    "The local share of the upcoming project, which includes pumping 320,000 cubic yards of sand from The Cove Beach in Cape May to Saint Peter's Beach in Cape May Point, will only be 8.75 percent of overall costs expected to exceed $5 million."

    The word 'from" means the stretch of beach that is GETTING sand. FROM the Cove to Saint Peters is GETTING sand.

    Either way, i dont expect it to hurt things at the Cove. That place is beyond hope. Except today..my god with HH SE swell and N winds that place must have been at least working today.
    okay from what I read my understanding was they were pumping out the cove. That place breaks like **** anymore no matter what . It has this nice little area inside but thats a bout it. The days of OH long lefts off the rocks are far gone I guess

  7. #7
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    sand

    The grain size is the result of water movement over underwater topography. Large grain is a result of current and tide pulling away small, easy to move, tiny grains. This compounds itself in that the larger grains have bigger spaces between them and allows more current to erode the topography. Making steep drop-offs. Small grains are the result of water flowing over or with topography. When the current flow is in tune with the topography(natures balance) small grains settle and compact. Giving solid bottom features and a lesser grade. Theres a lot more to it but thats it in a nutshell, so says the Army corps of engineers beach erosion assessment study. Reguardless, the grain size is a result of water action not the replenishment.

  8. #8
    I don't know about grain size from a hole in the wall but I know I moved to Monmouth Beach area in 1992 from NYC. The beaches were almost non-existent in Sea Bright/Monmouth/Long Branch but the surfing and Striper fishing was great. They then added the sand and to this day I hate going to Sea Bright to fish or surf. You walk into the water and your neck deep, no sand bars at all. Monmouth beach and Long Branch are not as bad as some sand bars come and go. Its funny to me, as the cry is that the sand is needed to protect the towns/and homes. Deal, which because they did not want to open the beaches for outsiders has not pumped any sand and yet it weathers every storm just fine.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by longbranchsurf View Post
    I don't know about grain size from a hole in the wall but I know I moved to Monmouth Beach area in 1992 from NYC. The beaches were almost non-existent in Sea Bright/Monmouth/Long Branch but the surfing and Striper fishing was great. They then added the sand and to this day I hate going to Sea Bright to fish or surf. You walk into the water and your neck deep, no sand bars at all. Monmouth beach and Long Branch are not as bad as some sand bars come and go. Its funny to me, as the cry is that the sand is needed to protect the towns/and homes. Deal, which because they did not want to open the beaches for outsiders has not pumped any sand and yet it weathers every storm just fine.
    Exactly. 5th street in Bethany Beach is never pumped and yet every year it's still there. I realize the wind helps to replinish it but maybe if we just back off and let things naturally return this wouldn't be an issue. I know of a few beaches that have never been pumped and they always seem to work it out on their own.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfer666 View Post
    Reguardless, the grain size is a result of water action not the replenishment.
    All i was saying is that grain size of material pumped onto the beach affects the way waves break on replenished beachs...

    fine grained sand (like assateague) tends to form offshore sand bars.
    Coarse grained sand (like currently pumped in Bethany) tends toward shorepound.

    The Corps specifically looks for offshore borrow sites with a specific grain size because it has such a major effect on the beach.

    My personal opinion is that they dont think enough about swimming/surfing and tend to pick coarser grained sand to pump because they are overly concerned with stability of the projects...like thats really working.