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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Shamong, New Jersey
    Posts
    13
    Started surfing about 4 years ago im 15 now. I really took off after my second year and im now able to do some nice carves and cutbacks. Just started surfing the fall and spring about a year ago. And when im able to drive i want to start surfing the winter. The best sessions ive had were my homebreak in barnegat light which is a long rolling left in about clean shoulder high waves.(Im Goofy foot) A nice break that i go to in beach haven that always works when the tide is low.

    Places id like to go to would be:

    -The Lighthouse in Cape Hatteras

    - Take the Pacific Coastliner train route in Southern California and surf every break along it

  2. #32
    started bodyboarding in 1990, didn't pick up my first surfboard until '03, a WRV funshape...it was the perfect board to learn on IMO and I still enjoy riding it some days....

    two best spots:
    1. Honalua Bay, Maui and some other spots along the road to Hana..wasn't big when I was there, but solid chest-head
    2. Witches Rock, CR 1-2ft OH
    & even though the place is way too crowded, IRI during Ernesto was one of the all-time best days of surfing...DOH+2-3ft and breaking clean right down the line....& Rodanthe Pier, NC when it was DOH was pretty sick!

    really want to surf the left coast, Blacks, Trestles
    and, of course, Indo...
    Last edited by Koki Barrels; Oct 12, 2010 at 09:12 PM.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Monmouth County.
    Posts
    573
    Images
    171
    Started bodyboarding 3 years ago, im only 17. Only been in nj.

    2 spots id love to go to:
    Laje do dramin

    Breakwall
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wilmington,DE
    Posts
    215
    Images
    1
    I started surfing in 1998 when I was 15.I had to take 3 years off from surfing due to knee reconstructive surgery.And an unfortunate fall down some stairs, which broke two of my leg bones last fall.The best waves I have surfed were on Hatteras Island and Roca Bruja this past July. I am planning on taking a trip to South Africa within the next year(I have always wanted to go on a safari and dive with white sharks) Indo would be a vacation of my dreams, hopefully I can make it there within the next few years.
    Last edited by andrewk529; Oct 12, 2010 at 09:44 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rehoboth
    Posts
    264
    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    When did you start surfing and how many years have you been surfing regularly?
    1. Started surfing in 1964 on a Royal Hawaiian pop-out by Dextra from Turco's Sport Center (WldWood) @ 14 in Cape May, then moved to OCM in '66, so I've been surfing for 46 years now. [/URL]
    Nice ride down memory lane in OCM for me it was '69, no surf beach, no leases and Dunes from 94 st to Bobby Bakers then more Dunes including the WWII watch towers dotted the beach all the way to Rehobeth Bch

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, MD
    Posts
    975
    Images
    951

    Welllll, since you asked. . .

    Quote Originally Posted by staystoked View Post
    Tons of respect for someone surfing that long.

    very curious, is it crazy to witness how much surfing evolved in just a mere 40 yrs?

    because its still schocking to me how much it evolved peformance wise in the 7 yrs i been in this blessed sport.


    like imagine 45 years ago you saw 20 yr old kids doin this http://www.surfline.com/video/webiso...part-one_42589

    these surfers are way ahead of their time
    . . . when I was 14 and wanted to spend $80 dollars (we're talking 1964 dollars here folks) my Dad thought it was a ridiculous amount of money on what was just a fad. Never mind that I first saw surfers in Huntington Beach in 1958 when my family drove cross country to visit Disneyland. Needless to say, in the interim I've seen fads come, and I've seen fads go, but the core of surfing remains intact. Vee-bottoms, Pig Shapes, Cuttle fish shapes (Ski), Rick Flex tails, flex decks, bonzers, sidewinders, thrusters, black-ball beaters, et al, ad nauseum. All the while I've always preferred a down-the-line speed approach with fluid transitions tailored to the shape of a particular wave. I started long @ 9'4" single fin and went short to a 5'10" twin fish. I lived through the fantasy worlds of Wilbur Kookmyer doing 360 barrel rolls (now that WOULD be impressive to see) and the raw power of Barry Kaniapuni's surfing, and the artful lines of Wayne Lynch, and the fluidity and power of Nat Young.

    In the midst of it all, I've been asked to judge contests (although I can't imagine why) and I have to say that what still impresses me the most is the surfer who can make the most of the wave by being in the optimal position with the greatest speed and the ability to control everything with well tuned fluidity, regardless of the style of board he's riding. So, sorry, but I have to say that "Air Punts" while flashy and skateboardish, typically don't seem to make the most of a wave. That's why I'm not especially impressed with skateboarding or snowboarding half-pipe. The medium doesn't move, just the rider does. I'll take fluidity over static wall any day.

    Even in the video all but a few wind up in the midst of soup, or not coming out of the aerial they've just done. While it might be fun, and fun to watch, I'd much rather see a nice fast and tight tube ride with either an exquisitely executed mega-floater, or a slashing roundhouse cutback to reposition yourself once again perfectly in the tube. Lip smacks are cool too as long as they maximize the utilization of the wave. If you're longboarding, making the most of the entire board while being perfectly positioned in the wave- up, down, around, and back again- and all while in complete control, now that's surfing. A punt is a punt, is a punt. 90% of the time that's the end of the wave for all but a rare few.

    So. . . are you sorry you asked? I'm not. Afterall, 46 years is a LONG time to see a lot of things, and it's all good, even punting.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    CAPE MAY ,NJ
    Posts
    2,894
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    . . . when I was 14 and wanted to spend $80 dollars (we're talking 1964 dollars here folks) my Dad thought it was a ridiculous amount of money on what was just a fad. Never mind that I first saw surfers in Huntington Beach in 1958 when my family drove cross country to visit Disneyland. Needless to say, in the interim I've seen fads come, and I've seen fads go, but the core of surfing remains intact. Vee-bottoms, Pig Shapes, Cuttle fish shapes (Ski), Rick Flex tails, flex decks, bonzers, sidewinders, thrusters, black-ball beaters, et al, ad nauseum. All the while I've always preferred a down-the-line speed approach with fluid transitions tailored to the shape of a particular wave. I started long @ 9'4" single fin and went short to a 5'10" twin fish. I lived through the fantasy worlds of Wilbur Kookmyer doing 360 barrel rolls (now that WOULD be impressive to see) and the raw power of Barry Kaniapuni's surfing, and the artful lines of Wayne Lynch, and the fluidity and power of Nat Young.

    In the midst of it all, I've been asked to judge contests (although I can't imagine why) and I have to say that what still impresses me the most is the surfer who can make the most of the wave by being in the optimal position with the greatest speed and the ability to control everything with well tuned fluidity, regardless of the style of board he's riding. So, sorry, but I have to say that "Air Punts" while flashy and skateboardish, typically don't seem to make the most of a wave. That's why I'm not especially impressed with skateboarding or snowboarding half-pipe. The medium doesn't move, just the rider does. I'll take fluidity over static wall any day.

    Even in the video all but a few wind up in the midst of soup, or not coming out of the aerial they've just done. While it might be fun, and fun to watch, I'd much rather see a nice fast and tight tube ride with either an exquisitely executed mega-floater, or a slashing roundhouse cutback to reposition yourself once again perfectly in the tube. Lip smacks are cool too as long as they maximize the utilization of the wave. If you're longboarding, making the most of the entire board while being perfectly positioned in the wave- up, down, around, and back again- and all while in complete control, now that's surfing. A punt is a punt, is a punt. 90% of the time that's the end of the wave for all but a rare few.

    So. . . are you sorry you asked? I'm not. Afterall, 46 years is a LONG time to see a lot of things, and it's all good, even punting.
    Said Perfect!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    396
    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    .....being in the optimal position with the greatest speed and the ability to control everything with well tuned fluidity.....
    As I read your post, I couldn't help but think about how much single-fin surfing reinforces these skills. Good post, MD.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Chadwick
    Posts
    1,297
    Michael Peterson did it best

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    . . . when I was 14 and wanted to spend $80 dollars (we're talking 1964 dollars here folks) my Dad thought it was a ridiculous amount of money on what was just a fad. Never mind that I first saw surfers in Huntington Beach in 1958 when my family drove cross country to visit Disneyland. Needless to say, in the interim I've seen fads come, and I've seen fads go, but the core of surfing remains intact. Vee-bottoms, Pig Shapes, Cuttle fish shapes (Ski), Rick Flex tails, flex decks, bonzers, sidewinders, thrusters, black-ball beaters, et al, ad nauseum. All the while I've always preferred a down-the-line speed approach with fluid transitions tailored to the shape of a particular wave. I started long @ 9'4" single fin and went short to a 5'10" twin fish. I lived through the fantasy worlds of Wilbur Kookmyer doing 360 barrel rolls (now that WOULD be impressive to see) and the raw power of Barry Kaniapuni's surfing, and the artful lines of Wayne Lynch, and the fluidity and power of Nat Young.

    In the midst of it all, I've been asked to judge contests (although I can't imagine why) and I have to say that what still impresses me the most is the surfer who can make the most of the wave by being in the optimal position with the greatest speed and the ability to control everything with well tuned fluidity, regardless of the style of board he's riding. So, sorry, but I have to say that "Air Punts" while flashy and skateboardish, typically don't seem to make the most of a wave. That's why I'm not especially impressed with skateboarding or snowboarding half-pipe. The medium doesn't move, just the rider does. I'll take fluidity over static wall any day.

    Even in the video all but a few wind up in the midst of soup, or not coming out of the aerial they've just done. While it might be fun, and fun to watch, I'd much rather see a nice fast and tight tube ride with either an exquisitely executed mega-floater, or a slashing roundhouse cutback to reposition yourself once again perfectly in the tube. Lip smacks are cool too as long as they maximize the utilization of the wave. If you're longboarding, making the most of the entire board while being perfectly positioned in the wave- up, down, around, and back again- and all while in complete control, now that's surfing. A punt is a punt, is a punt. 90% of the time that's the end of the wave for all but a rare few.

    So. . . are you sorry you asked? I'm not. Afterall, 46 years is a LONG time to see a lot of things, and it's all good, even punting.

    haha I am very happy I asked!
    thanks for the wisdom.


    You are right, when it comes down to it surfing will always be just you and the wave, with only a surfboard as separation. Its true you are not really surfing if you’re up in the air, but surfing is progressing so fast that their not just “punts " they link airs to turns to airs again. as fun and exciting as it is to watch, I hope the youth of surfing doesn’t get sold on " how high you can fly " and forget all about carving, snaps, bottom turns, cut backs, floaters…….heaven forbid the tube..

    You never know because all the pros have to do crazy airs now just to keep up in a contest. Snaps and cut backs don’t do it any more for the fast paced crowd and judging. 10 yrs from now who knows what professional surfing will be like.

    There’s no right or wrong way to surf. You can’t judge style, just like you can’t have a contest to see which artist made a nicer painting.