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Thread: Firewires

  1. #1

    Firewires

    Whats more durable, the rapidfire technology, or the regular firewire technology. Like which is more prone to pressure dings, etc.

  2. #2
    the regular technology is stronger,,, the one with the bamboo decks are just a drop stronger then your average PU board

  3. #3
    The regular technology is definitely stronger and the direct drive models are the strongest. I have seen some horrible pressure dings on the rapid fire where the glassing cracked through and the wood broke. I have the DD flexfire and I love it.

  4. #4
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    I was looking at the Firewire Sweet Potato... and after reading the Firewire message board, I wasn't comfortable with the pressure dents the Rapidfire technology gets and how easily/ fast they get them. They tried to pass it off as normal, which it may be, by I dont like "foot wells" in my board, as they called them. So i decided to have the boys at Coil shape me a replica.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Exit98Surf View Post
    I was looking at the Firewire Sweet Potato... and after reading the Firewire message board, I wasn't comfortable with the pressure dents the Rapidfire technology gets and how easily/ fast they get them. They tried to pass it off as normal, which it may be, by I dont like "foot wells" in my board, as they called them. So i decided to have the boys at Coil shape me a replica.
    Yeah good idea... how much would a custom shape be?

  6. #6
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    About $650

  7. #7
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    ding repair question...under the deck surface, and under the white paint that is directly under the deck, is a brown cardboard colored material that is pretty thick and completely porous. It is almost the texture of a hard sponge.

    What is it?

    pretty challenging to do a major repair when the core material just under the deck is porous and will soak resin in and bubble out internal air pressure.

    LBCrew?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitchell View Post
    ding repair question...under the deck surface, and under the white paint that is directly under the deck, is a brown cardboard colored material that is pretty thick and completely porous. It is almost the texture of a hard sponge.

    What is it?

    pretty challenging to do a major repair when the core material just under the deck is porous and will soak resin in and bubble out internal air pressure.

    LBCrew?
    I believe what you're talking about is Corecell, which is a very durable, relatively stiff, highly impact resistant, foam skin that helps protect the soft, low density eps core. Sandwiched between the glass and the core, it shouldn't outgas unless it's been compromised all the way through. In other words, it's not the Corecell that breathing, its the foam underneath. Still, it's the same problem... bubbles. Similarly, the Corecell shouldn't soak up much resin. It should only fill in the holes exposed at the surface. The holes shouldn't connect to each other all the way through. But again, if the Corecell is ruptured, the foam core will suck resin in like crazy through the opening in the Corecell. I'd try to thicken some resin with microballoons so it's a barely workable paste, and squeeze that paste down into the ding as far as you can. Let that cure and hope it seals the foam beneath the Corecell skin. Then do your repair over that. Do all the work in falling temps, so any movement of gas and/or repair material will be into, rather than out of, the core. Also... the vent should keep the core from breathing too much, so make sure it's not clogged.

  9. #9
    Ive had an original firewire for 3 years. Finally broke it last swell. I pulled into a drainer and the board literally just folded in half. I will admit i was probably at the weight limit for the size of the board. It was a 5'10 x 2 1/4 and i weigh 185-190. I guess it just took its toll after 3 years of regular use.

    Would get another one in a heartbeat. These days theres so much new crazy technology coming out though that its almost hard to keep up. Apparently theres a board out now that you hook up a bike pump to and change the stiffness. Unreal.