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  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by sharknado View Post
    Really?? You're bothered by stretching? That's your "biggest problem"?
    totally brah

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by baddy trailerpark View Post
    wanna get better? try a f/w advance. i've been short boarding for 50 years - yup 50 - and i HAVE NEVER
    seen a board work so well. just a thot...
    I surf a 6'8" performance egg, which is quite tossable. My problem is that work gets in the way of my surfing all the time. If I were out there 5 days a week, my skill would rapidly improve. I just bought a 9'2" log so I can start going out when there is minimal swell. SC is lacking in the consistency department.

  3. #63
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbx View Post
    Here's the thing that gets to me though, I get everyone can talk in platitudes and cliches about surfing, I mean really, is there any other way to talk about it? So yeah, you feel so free, so alive, so in touch with nature, all that. But when I was a kid, I don't remember any adult beginners. Can anyone who was surfing 25 or 30 years ago confirm or deny that? The closest I remember might be some kid's dad who used to surf and got a longboard when you could get a new one again at the local shops. Like, an adult beginner wouldn't have even seemed like a possibility to me. So what has changed? Is it surf schools, wetsuit technology, softtops, what? It can just be that everyone wants to feel good now and before they didn't?
    Adults are in better shape and have more free time now. That is my guess.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by brewengineer View Post
    Adults are in better shape and have more free time now. That is my guess.
    Unless they're not. Lots of fat people out there these days. Hold on to your fried chicken bro.

  5. #65
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Unless they're not. Lots of fat people out there these days. Hold on to your fried chicken bro.
    Most of the fatties stick to SUPs around here. And they are fun to watch, since they constantly fall off.

  6. #66
    Oh man there were no fatties in Rhodey last night. This one petitely athletic wahine on a SB came screaming down the line sporting a bright orange top that didn't cover the midsection. Talk about wanting to drop in.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    I don't remember there being any adult beginners back in the 70s and 80s. Not sure why there are so many today. I think the availability of surf reports, cams etc make it much easier to be a casual surfer nowadays than it ever was in the past. Had an adult beginner paddled out into the middle of me and my friends back then we would have looked at each other confused and a bit amused. Our reaction would have been no different than if a 60 year old showed up at the local skate bowl decked out in pads and a helmet and was attempting to drop in, it just doesn't fit. It's funny today I was out, was one of the older guys (I'm 48) among a group of local kids. Then some truly older beginners paddled out on long boards, they sat in a cluster and hooted each other into waves. I don't think any of them got an open line but they seemed to be having fun. All it usually takes is one good wave and they won't even think of paddling if they see me show interest. I would rather surf in that situation with those people then a bunch of guys at my skill level or better, that gets exhausting.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    portland
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    what i've learned (and it's a lot so i'll probably forget some here):

    1.) get out...A LOT
    2.) be a good swimmer and use that to offset any surfing deficiencies you may have
    3.) never be afraid of conditions (either go out with determined confidence or find somewhere else smaller to go out)
    4.) fall...A LOT and have as much fun with the fall as the wave (no matter if it's a failed attempt, mid line, or at the end of the line)
    5.) trust your board, love your board (and find its sweet spot as you said you have...then exploit it)
    6.) watch videos of badasses
    7.) workout & then workout some more when you are finding something you are deficient at (this mixing up can get workout evolving and changing which ensures they don't get too stale)
    8.) go out A LOT in any condition, especially crappy/blown out...surfing only the easy, clean-lines, medium period a.) spoils you b.) limits your adaptability to conditions and your willingness to adjust (for example, Arthur, and the break I was at, forced me to go right...I'm goofy...but I had some of the best rights i've ever had - that felt great)
    9.) off-shores can be a beyatch to paddles against. ESPECIALLY a.) depending on how your break works b.) where the tide is at your break and how it works. i remember one session in particular i was out in feb or mar... off shores were 20ish mph, tide was working in (and was half way) and the waves were overhead...had a very difficult time catching anything, 'cause a.) winds b.) tides c.) heart rate was amped d.) overhead was a ton of moving water to catch up with and i was extremely reluctant to attempt a late drop
    10.) tides, your spot, swell direction, and wind direction are everything
    11.) see the wave, identify/predict the wave, time the wave, go for the wave
    12.) know how the waves tend to break where you go...ie, watch for channels and make sure you aren't trying to catch a wave that you constantly get hung up on the shoulder because you are too far away from the heart of the wave
    13.) just when you feel you have it, take another paddle or two...unless you're going late drop
    14.) don't think about it too much...quote that comes to mind, "i don't have to think. i only have to do it."

    that's about all i have for now...there's much, much more though

  9. #69
    Hey Jake you may need to look and watch the wave to judge when to paddle hard and go for the pop. Watch others from the beach and you will see it curl then crest. You should be up as it turns to white water. Feel free to contact me with any questions. Aloha Ed @ alohanycsurfschool.com

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    barefoot bay, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbx View Post
    I don't think I've exhibited "hate," just pointing out a change I've observed and maybe don't understand. My question: adult beginners did not exist, now they do. Why? Although I will admit that many days I "hate" just about everybody else out in the water. I think the biggest problem with adult beginners is probably that they seem to almost universally do all kinds of weird stretching/yoga type stuff before paddling out. What is that?
    its the cialis commercials, all these old guys can get boners and surf, very inspirational.

    and for the OP: paddle out to just past where the waves are breaking and inch your way forward into the sweet spot, you'll sometimes just catch the wave without even paddling.