Longboard suggestions?

Discussion in 'Surfboards and Surfboard Design' started by Amber, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. Amber

    Amber New Member

    3
    Aug 20, 2012
    Any longboard suggestions for a beginner in Ft. Lauderdale? I'm 5'2\", 115 lbs, and moderately coordinated. I paddleboard, but would really like to get into surfing. What should I look for in a board (length, volume, fin set-up)? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jizwhale

    jizwhale Well-Known Member

    Oct 8, 2011
    I'd put you on something like a 7'6'' tri-fin. Not less then 7' or more then 8'. Less then 7' isn't a long board and more then 8' is way big for you. Good luck
     

  3. Amber

    Amber New Member

    3
    Aug 20, 2012
    Thanks, Doug!
     
  4. Agabinet

    Agabinet Well-Known Member

    309
    May 3, 2012
    The McTavish 8 Ball is a reasonable and reasonably priced all arounder in the 8 foot range. I also like the NSPs in the 7 - 8 foot range for basic boards.
     
  5. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    I own the McTavish 8 Ball 8' 1" and it's a GREAT board, you'll love it
     
  6. Agabinet

    Agabinet Well-Known Member

    309
    May 3, 2012
    by the way, I am more than reasonable coordinated, I'm dang well corrdinated, and I find stand up paddling HARD TO DO!
     
  7. super fish

    super fish Well-Known Member

    Sep 2, 2008
    i would get a mini arrow cj nelson model
     
  8. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    Yeah it's harder than it looks, however once you get the hang of it you will progress rather quickly, but it takes plenty of water time in the beginning to get confortable to the point where you don't ever think about falling, once you get that comfort zone it gets really fun
     
  9. wave1rider65

    wave1rider65 Well-Known Member

    405
    Aug 31, 2009
    Just for accuracy.......Longboards start at 9'. Anything under with a round nose is an egg,funshape or hybrid.
    Just sayin'.
     
  10. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    I think he meant for her size it's a long board, most people aren't 5'2"
     
  11. wave1rider65

    wave1rider65 Well-Known Member

    405
    Aug 31, 2009
    Has nothing to do with her size..........He said and I quote "Less than 7' is not a longboard". Less than 9' is not a longboard no matter what size the person on the board is. At 5'2 a 7'6 is going to be a long board to her but not a Longboard for her .......savvy.......If she paddleboards she can ride a 9' LB
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2012
  12. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    You are correct about 9' being regulation however only Doug can verify what he really meant by that. I agree that she can probably handle a 9' LB but is it necessary for her at that size? Probably not...
     
  13. ClemsonSurf

    ClemsonSurf Well-Known Member

    Dec 10, 2007
    I was going to ask this same question. I've heard a longboard has to be 9' and I've heard thu have to be 3' taller than the rider. Which is it?
     
  14. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    9' is regulation but I say unless you are going to be competing it doesn't really matter, unless you just want to be able to say yours is regulation size. I doubt anybody on the beach will be coming out to measure your board hahaha
     
  15. Amber

    Amber New Member

    3
    Aug 20, 2012
    Thanks everyone for your expertise. The board hunt is on!
     
  16. Mikey

    Mikey Well-Known Member

    244
    Oct 3, 2008
    you will do fine with a 7-6 or so. my brat daughter is 5-6/140/16year old. her 'longboard' is a 7-6 single fin egg that we made together in the garage. she, like lots of young ladies, just didn't want to lug a big board around. on her 7-6 she can catch any small ripple of a wave and groove along and do the occasional cutback. you should be able to find a decent used board in this size range because a lot of folks use them for learning and then move on to either a regular 9 foot plus longboard or to a fish or other shortboard.
     
  17. shutch

    shutch Member

    11
    Aug 9, 2012
    If you're going for a new board you may want to consider talking to a local shaper, someone who knows the breaks you'll be surfing.
     
  18. jizwhale

    jizwhale Well-Known Member

    Oct 8, 2011
    I consider fun shapes and eggs to be types of longboards or longboard “hybrids”.
    Amber isn’t looking for a regulation longboard to enter the next contest with because she is a beginner. Being a beginner, she’s basically looking for something good to learn on that’s not a shortboard. Right?
    Generally if it’s not a shortboard it’s a longboard. Can I come up with a more accurate breakdown of what every board between 5 and 10 feet is called? Of course I can but, I didn’t sense the need to accurately categorize every type of surfboard in my reply. That’s just my opinion, and not meant to ruffle any feathers.
     
  19. WesB

    WesB Well-Known Member

    48
    Dec 30, 2008
    Amber, It's a loaded question, honestly. you could do well with anything from 7'6 on up. It depends on what you want to do with the board. You said you were wanting to get started. Longboarding can be a blast and I know women your size and smaller who fully rock a 9' and 9'6 longboard. However if you are looking to also progress into a shorter board style of riding you may want to look at either buying one for each condition or buying something that will not so much have you walking the board but instead working the wave.

    I ride Degree33 boards as they are in an excellent price range and a well made board. Some people swear on different names and that can be costly and yet provide you no additional help except make the pocketbook lighter. Soft tops can also be fun and only cost about $150 new. You can pick up the basics from that and then move on to something else without wreaking havoc on your credit. See if you have a friend who can let you borrow a board to see what works best for you. I like to let people try boards before they buy. Good luck.
     
  20. Agabinet

    Agabinet Well-Known Member

    309
    May 3, 2012
    I always wonder about this kind of advice for learners. Not that it is a bad idea to talk to a great local shaper and get good etquipment, that is always good advice. But whether really tailored or high end equipment is worth it when you're in the learning phase. I felt the same way about motorcycles wheni used to ride on the track. Did it make sense for folks just starting out to ride highly capable sport bikes, when they could go just as fast, given their skills, on a ten year old ratbike? Clearly a learning surfer shouldn't have the wrong board for her break, but a reasonable all arounder might be just as useful as a custom board, and might be better investment until she is ready to appreciate that custom. OM the other hand, she might start and do well with that custom, and only years later appreciate why it made the learning curve faster!