Surfboard design has left me behind

Discussion in 'Surfboards and Surfboard Design' started by Toonces, Nov 21, 2016.

  1. Valhallalla

    Valhallalla Well-Known Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    What a great topic and tread! Keep it up fellers. I wish I could contribute something but I am a mediocre surfer at best with limited experience and abilities. I've learned a lot though. Thanks for keeping it on topic.
     
  2. Barry Cuda

    Barry Cuda Guest

    Just wait until all you mid fifty aged hit the mid 60s. Big drop off in energy for me despite no alcohol, no drugs, eat lots of veggies etc, take vitamins, etc. There is no stopping, but maybe one can slow down, the aging process. But, on a better note, I have been surfing now for 55 years. I have a few more years to go on my 7 ft boards, then longboards. But SUPs?? Fvck you......twat yachts, nothing more.....
     

  3. Wavestrom

    Wavestrom Well-Known Member

    475
    Jul 5, 2014
    That's true no doubt but I do like seeing how many old dudes there are surfing and having a great time most days I'm out. Gives me hope for 20 more years of this.
     
  4. sisurfdogg

    sisurfdogg Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2013
    Thanks - good stuff. Why do you prefer your wide/thick point behind center on a board made for good waves. And how far behind center do you like it - 2 or 3"?
     
  5. sisurfdogg

    sisurfdogg Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2013
    I gotta give you credit. It takes commitment. And totally agree with you on the SUP, might as well just get that jet powered board and go totally full on douche canoe.
     
  6. Valhallalla

    Valhallalla Well-Known Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    There's a dude that surfs down here by me that has a WaveJet board. Claims he only uses it for the paddle out. Yeah right. Funny how he sometimes is able to mysteriously accelerate at will to make it past a section. Nice enough guy but man that shiit is ghey.
     
  7. UnfurleD

    UnfurleD Well-Known Member

    960
    Jul 13, 2016
    and ridikulously heavy too. at least it was when they gave out a demo years ago
     
  8. Valhallalla

    Valhallalla Well-Known Member

    Jan 24, 2013
    I've never actually picked up his board but that's what I've read. It has a gigantic battery pack thing that goes in the bottom and of course the jet system itself. I could see if you had some physical issues to where you can't paddle or something but I think this guy just has a bunch of money and wanted to spend it. I still think it's lame.
     
  9. Average Joe

    Average Joe Well-Known Member

    48
    Jun 18, 2014
    I tend to disagree with the "anti-volume" comments on this thread. I'm 6'1, 205 dripping wet and surf boards from 34 liters to 37 liters.

    I think surf simply does a pretty good job of discussing volume in this article http://surfsimply.com/surf-coaching/volume-weight-ratios/.

    For me, looking at volume has really changed how I buy my boards. I find the sweet spot volumes for me fit pretty much in line with the chart in that article and I make decisions on rocker, rails, tail, etc depending on the conditions that the board will be used in.
     
  10. LBCrew

    LBCrew Well-Known Member

    Aug 12, 2009
    He may be after something different... which is why he needs to talk to his shaper... but my personal preference is to get the wide point between my feet more. If this is a board for "good waves," I'd still be looking for performance. If it was for "big waves," I'd be looking more for a board that has down the line speed and projection, in which case I'd want the wide point at center, as opposed to behind it. Putting the wide point behind center also lets you put more curve in the outline from the wide point back, and if he's looking for a round tail, it all flows together nicely.

    For boards for small and medium sized waves, I like my wide point at or ahead of center, depending on whether it's a groveler type shortboard (at center), or an alt shape or fish (ahead of center).
     
  11. Toonces

    Toonces Well-Known Member

    355
    Apr 25, 2016
    Certainly volume has its place, Average Joe. I read the article, although I don't understand some of the findings.

    It's just been a long time since I've personally gone into a surf shop and taken a really hard look at buying a stock short board. But the last time I looked, on the east coast we're talking probably 20 years ago, I seem to remember being able to walk into a surf shop and pick up a stock 6'2-6'6 without looking to hard. Just now, looking at the Warmwinds surf shop locally, their website doesn't list a single "...Lost Quiver Killer" above 6'3; and for that matter, only one, whereas there are about 10 in the 5'7-5'10 range. There was a time when a shortboard was a 6'0 to 6'2, and now it seems that sub-6'0 is the norm.

    Sure, volume matters. Mitchell probably makes the most relevant case that modern shaping is hiding volume so that your 5'9 of today is equal in volume to the 6'2 of yesterday. But I think that misses a lot of the point. I need those extra inches in front of me. Volume isn't everything. Certainly I "feel" like I need those extra inches to keep the nose out of the water.

    To reference your article, I wonder if going shorter would translate to better surfing for me. I don't think it would. I wonder where that break point is? In an honest assessment of my own surfing, I think maybe my board is holding me back 10%, but I don't know that 10% better board would equal 10% better surfing. I don't know if this even makes sense. But like I posted a while back, a good surfer can make a turd work. I sort of feel that I can only surf on different levels of turd. But looking at something like the CI website, I feel totally out of touch with the surfer they're building for. I feel like most of the nuances would be totally lost on someone of my skill and fitness level. It used to be I could just get my "stock" short board in a 6'6 and just not worry about it. Now I'm not even sure where to start looking.

    Does that make sense?
     
  12. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    Dude, I think you're over analyzing things. Sh*t hasn't changed all that much, just go with what works for you. If you've been surfing as long as you say, you should know what works at this point. My suggestion, go with a 5'11' stubby round tail thruster. Decent nose rocker, but with some volume under chest. Simple, but effective.
     
  13. LBCrew

    LBCrew Well-Known Member

    Aug 12, 2009
    Word.

    You'll do your best surfing on what you feel works best for you. Confidence in your equipment is half the game, especially when you're pushing toward your own limits.

    But... if you want to explore, do it. To add to that, building your own board makes exploring waaaay more affordable... and fun.

    Who cares if you're out of what's trending.
     
  14. Toonces

    Toonces Well-Known Member

    355
    Apr 25, 2016
    ^ LOL.

    The whole point is that I find myself questioning if my entire approach to surfboards has been wrong.

    Go with what works for me? A 5'11 would be the shortest surfboard I've ever surfed in my entire 25+ year surfing career. I most certainly DO NOT know that that would work for me.

    My point is that, looking at surfboard design, off the rack, from fresh eyes, is a bit shocking.

    I'm not looking for anyone to pick a board out for me. I'm just enjoying a dialogue on how much surfboard design has changed. And for that matter, I'll argue it's more critical for us on the east coast. I never even heard of a "groveler" until I move to Rhode Island. I don't mean to sound smug- I live here. But my entire perspective on what a "rideable" wave has been challenged since I moved here.
     
  15. Toonces

    Toonces Well-Known Member

    355
    Apr 25, 2016
    I agree on over-analyzing, though. I thought that myself.

    I feel like I'm doing something wrong going with what "feels right" for me, but you guys have certainly made me feel a bit validated. I just don't think a 5'9 anything will work for me. I'm just not sure where all the MBB's went; I guess that's my ultimate point.
     
  16. Kanman

    Kanman Well-Known Member

    732
    May 5, 2014
    Not sure how nimble you are or quick to your feet, but I've found riding a board that's thick, has a wide plan shape, roundish nose and soft rails, a "groveler", has significantly improved and made my surfing experience much more enjoyable. I've only been shredding for about 3 years now but on many days when I've been out in medium size conditions I've out performed most other people in the water. I catch more waves, ride them longer and have more maneuverability on my grovel board. And I'm not limited to two foot slop. I can take that this thing with me almost every where. Worth testing out to say the least. Find a shop, do some demos and experiment. Or buy some ish off Craigslist, sell it if you don't like it.
     
  17. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    My frame of reference for suggesting a 5'11' is based on what I'm riding. My Fish hybrid is a beefy 6'4", most foam under chest and foiled at the nose and swallow tail. Gets me into waves early but it's all business when you get on the tail. Then my HPSB is 6ft. with considerably less volume but still good amount of foam. Any reputable shaper will give you proper volume given your size and ability. I'm 5'9" and 180lbs in comparison to you. So a 5'11" wouldn't be out of the question if you're 5'4".
     
  18. Toonces

    Toonces Well-Known Member

    355
    Apr 25, 2016
    ^ I really do appreciate the feedback. A 5'11 would be a huge paradigm shift for me.
     
  19. WesB

    WesB Well-Known Member

    48
    Dec 30, 2008
    I think it was said best earlier when they said pick the boards up and feel them in your hands, your arms...you will know. I am 57 y/o 6'1 and 175. I have only been surfing for 9 years but in the winter I will surf what keeps me taller in the water. Summer I may surf my home made 5'10 but most of the winter (I don't have to go thicker than a 4/3) I am either on my 6'4 home shaped retro fish (21.5 wide, 2.75 thick) or a 6'6 egg if I am not riding a log. Before I started shaping my own boards, a 6'10 egg was one of my favorite go to's. Normally in 5 mil I would not expect to be rippin it up, but would be more about the stoke of the ride so speed and agility can take the back seat to living the life.
     
  20. sisurfdogg

    sisurfdogg Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2013

    A "magic board", one we find orfinds us every
    so often, hopefully, is a true wonder to behold. It will let you surf better and more naturally.
    But you are correct, some dudes can shred on a refrigerator door.