what level are you?

Discussion in 'Global Surf Talk' started by waterbaby, Apr 20, 2015.

What level are you?

  1. Beginner

    11 vote(s)
    12.4%
  2. Intermediate

    44 vote(s)
    49.4%
  3. Advanced

    29 vote(s)
    32.6%
  4. Expert

    5 vote(s)
    5.6%
  1. waterbaby

    waterbaby Well-Known Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    all things considered (amount you surf, paddle power, maneuvers, etc), what level do you think you are as a surfer? If you're in between any two, elaborate.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2015
  2. rcarter

    rcarter Well-Known Member

    Jul 26, 2009
    Kelly Slater level fo sho!
     

  3. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    Depends what criteria is being used for each category. Can you define each one so we have a set standard by which we measure our d*cks... i mean skill level lmao
     
  4. waterbaby

    waterbaby Well-Known Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    I voted intermediate (but probably closer to advanced intermediate). I don't surf nearly as much as I'd like...not for lack of waves, but just too many obligations. That keeps me from being "on my game" and paddle muscles not firing as well as they could. In glassier/peakier waves, I don't miss...but I kinda suck when it's sloppy. Probably more mental than anything, since I won't go over the ledge unless I'm sure I'm going to make it and get a long ride. My maneuvers are pretty old school, but based on other surfers, my forte' is style and power.

    There are so many guys at my break that are, what I consider, pro (expert) level...guess it comes with the territory when you grow up with an ultra consistent break in your backyard. No matter how sloppy the conditions, they are always catching waves and annihilating them all the way to the beach them...it's inspiring and depressing at the same time.
     
  5. DawnPatrol321

    DawnPatrol321 Well-Known Member

    Mar 6, 2012
    I voted intermediate but sometimes I do things I would consider advanced. Still got lots to improve on, but having fun doing it.
     
  6. your pier

    your pier Well-Known Member

    Dec 2, 2013
    can catch a lot in a lot of different situations with only two boards to select from...just started to get in to carving frontside (going left...i'm goofy) and making some quick snaps...

    my complaint is that the place i frequent the most, which is also the place the works the most often, it's easy to pick up on the lefts and most people don't sit there so i've gotten way to comfortable going frontside....i usually don't go down to the right peak because there are some pretty sick bros that frequent there and i don't wanna fup their spot for my weak-a$$ backside

    so long story short, gotta get quicker with the snaps (and this one spot up here with some steep, late, drops gotta get better there too) and get better backside before i go strong intermediate

    i guess this all just goes by what the perception of the terms is...we been there before on this site a bit i think
     
  7. LostKahukuBoy

    LostKahukuBoy Well-Known Member

    132
    Nov 4, 2014
    I'd consider myself an advanced surfer. Biggest I've surfed is solid 7ft Hawaiian aka 14 ft faces. I rode my dad's 8'0 "mini-tanker" as he calls it. I thrive when the surf is 6ft plus, because thats when I can do some truly powerful and smoothly executed carves both frontside and backside. My backside snap has gotten really good.

    I can paddle for 5 hours straight if the surf warrants it. I can surf just about most boards given enough time on it.
     
  8. Hawky

    Hawky Well-Known Member

    850
    May 9, 2014
    i voted intermediate and i'm not going to try to come up with an excuse of why
     
  9. EmassSpicoli

    EmassSpicoli Well-Known Member

    Apr 16, 2013
    No one's clicked in yet as a self-admitted kook. Maybe I'll break the ice with that lol

    WB - I like this tread. Let's get people's thoughts on the various criteria for each strata of progression.
     
  10. waterbaby

    waterbaby Well-Known Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    thanks...just trying to contribute.

    Kinda surprised at the results, so far, since I figured most people would vote "advanced".

    I just ordered some new boards and the shaper asked me what level I was. Had to think about that one and, even though I may be "advanced-intermediate", I said just "intermediate" because, imo, I don't surf enough to put myself any higher.
     
  11. EmassSpicoli

    EmassSpicoli Well-Known Member

    Apr 16, 2013
    Let's hear the criteria bud. I'd imagine it'd include some of the following:

    - Break management skills (BB, PB, RB)
    - Ability to ride different board lengths and types
    - Ability to perform in wide range of conditions (wind, period, swell)
    - Difficulty of maneuvers and depth/well-roundedness of maneuvers
    - Wave catching ability on board with volume relative to body size

    Wild card:
    - Wetsuite of choice
     
  12. Mattyb

    Mattyb Well-Known Member

    342
    Apr 2, 2013
    When I was 18 I was pretty sick. At 22 3 months after a combat deployment my gun section got into a training accident and I sustained a traumatic brain injury. Im extremely blessed and lucky to be able to live somewhat normally. That being said ill be an intermediate for life because my equilibrium is crooked. Some waves I rip like I used to and throw buckets and step on turns. Some waves I look like im surfing drunk. My buds say im too hard on myself, but that's because when my brain works properly I rip like I used to. Unfortunately, that's only half the time. Again im blessed, some guys with similar injury cant tie their own shoes, so if I cant launch an air and will be an intermediate for life...im still lucky and stoked to surf.
     
  13. waterbaby

    waterbaby Well-Known Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    great attitude.

    I, too, always think/hope I'm going to improve...but I'm also grateful just to be in the situation I'm in. Could be worse...a lot worse.
     
  14. waterbaby

    waterbaby Well-Known Member

    Oct 1, 2012
    "criteria"?!...yeah, I guess we should have some of that.

    idk, if you can't manage a point break, you're automatically in the beginner area. Reef breaks can be much less predictable, but, once again, if you can't surf a reef break, I would say you're still some form of beginner. Beach breaks are frequently shifty and drifty...for instance, the amount of paddling just to stay in position makes me less critical.

    If you can truely perform on all board sizes and types, I'd say automatic advanced. I admit I suck at longboarding. They're hard to spin around to catch a wave (the heavy ones take like 15 strokes just to plane) and you gotta run all over the place just to turn...not my thing.

    If you can "read" slop...automatic advanced.

    Maneuvers?...there are so many other prior facets to surfing before even bringing them in.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2015
  15. daeggman

    daeggman Well-Known Member

    184
    Sep 18, 2014
    i don't think ill ever consider myself as expert, or even advanced for that matter. there's always so much you can improve on and some many boards to master, plus all the different conditions... it blows my mind

    i do think I'm an advanced LBer and potentially advanced when it comes to charging biggish surf but I could still perform so many more maneuvers and I could always get barreled better

    also my SBing in smallish surf is weak, i'm really lazy when it comes to that, you can only pump so much

    all in all im intermediate
     
  16. worsey

    worsey Well-Known Member

    Oct 13, 2013
    i was an expert but i got fat so then i was just advanced but then i got old and became an int and then
    i bought high-volume boards thus becoming a beginner.
     
  17. Zippy

    Zippy Well-Known Member

    Nov 16, 2007
    I think it depends on the time you came up. If I could go back in time and surf the 70's or early 80's at my current level I would be considered advanced. By today's standards with the emphasis on airs and acrobatics I would be consider intermediate at best. The problem is surfing progresses but the human body doesn't so it's inevitable that the longer you surf the further you will fall behind.
     
  18. mattinvb

    mattinvb Well-Known Member

    593
    Sep 9, 2014
    Saw this on surfline a while back...

    Recently I had a coworker, surfer, ask me weather she was a beginner or intermediate surfer. I (carefully) told her she was a beginner. She asked (and here is the question): What is the definition of a beginner, intermediate and advance surfer?????? I answered, "I can tell (as most competent surfers can) just by looking." But in 34 years of surfing I don't think I've ever heard a definition of what level a surfer surfs, beginner, intermediate or advanced.
    asked by TC

    A

    Surfing sage Nick Carroll responds:

    Wow! What a question. Kinda strikes to the heart of how we see surfing: is it something to be done, or judged, or both?

    I suspect the reason you haven't read a definition of surfers as beginner/intermediate/advanced is partly because such a triage definition is a bit too simple for such a complex activity. It may also partly be because many of us tend to view surfing skill as something that's kind of magical: obtained by birthright, perhaps, or by some other stroke of fortune which makes it difficult to fully grasp or analyze.

    Perhaps surfing might better be compared with a martial art such as karate or tae kwon do, where there are numerous levels of skill and no absolute peak. But be that as it may, we're prepared to have a shot at the triage:

    a BEGINNER is a surfer who is yet to successfully paddle out alone and catch and ride a wave cleanly to its logical finish.

    an INTERMEDIATE rider is a surfer who can successfully paddle out alone at a familiar location and catch and ride waves to a logical finish frontside or backside, confidently using the three basic surfing turns - bottom turn, top turn and cutback.

    an ADVANCED rider is a surfer who can paddle out alone to a surf spot he/she has never ridden, assess the lineup, and catch and ride waves to his/her choice of finish, confidently using a full range of turns in a distinctive, effective style.

    There, that's a start. At least until the ASP starts handing out colored belts.
     
  19. worsey

    worsey Well-Known Member

    Oct 13, 2013
    hi-ho
    hi-ho
    its back-a-wards i go.

    boom boom boom
    lets go back to the womb.
     
  20. chicharronne

    chicharronne Well-Known Member

    Jun 22, 2006
    11.

    [video=youtube;KOO5S4vxi0o]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOO5S4vxi0o[/video]