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Thread: Flex

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Atlantic City
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    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    you want to learn about flex, ride a soft top in some sizeable surf. Cranking off the tail you can actually see and feel the front half whipping all around. Insane.
    i think i'm gonna try dis...just so we on same page do you mean a 'softop' board by surftech
    or a softboard type softtop...and thanks in advance for this fresh idea....

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Singer Island
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    I am designing a 9'3" hplb. The blank (it is pu foam, not eps) has a single stringer 1/4". It has lots of rocker and foil front and back. Mostly flat and 50/50 rails in the middle. I want it to flex, but not go crazy on good waves in the chest to head high range. How do you modulate the flex so it doesn't try to bounce you off on a good size wave on the bottom turn. I have concave up on the front 1/3, and vee on the last foot. Flat in the middle. So I think it should have decent flex, but now that I am reading this thread, I wonder if I should tweak it before I lay on the glass. I know....bend your knees! But, it is nice to have a clue as to how it will handle when it really gets up to speed.

  3. #13
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    Aug 2009
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    Monmouth Beach, NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by sisurfdogg View Post
    How do you modulate the flex so it doesn't try to bounce you off on a good size wave on the bottom turn.
    Deck patch.

  4. #14
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    Jun 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Deck patch.
    Thank you sir!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Cackalacka border beaches
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    99
    I feel flex when I bottom turn an old clapped out, mushy deck PU board. Feels like I tapped the brakes. No squirt or not as much squirt. It's because more bend is being put into the rocker under my feet from my weight and slows me down a little. Straight is fast and curve is slow with overall rocker. Especially under my back foot on a shorty where it wears out the fastest and where I set a rail from, toe side mostly for me. I want my boards to be stiff and not flexy end to end. And not too bouncy like those PVC sheet foam 1lb. core stringerless tufflite boards which I have heard to be described as "too stiff" which I don't feel when I'm on one. They actually go pretty good far as I can tell but the hollow feel is not my fave.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    Oh yeah, one more thing.
    I have never felt what I perceive as "flex" more than on this board, bash a lip and it really does feel like it loads up and then releases energy. More so than the original Coils and definitely more than any of my poly/wood stringer boards. Could be all in my head:
    +1. First time I rode my first coil, which is designed for better waves and much more foiled out in the tail and the rails then my daily driver, the flex through me off. I felt it most coming off a bottom turn. Had more spring out of the turn then the board I had been used to at the time. It took me a session or two to dial into it.

    My daily driver coil is a short disc shape with lots of volume taken to the rails since I'm heavy. Has much less noticeable flex characteristics.

    I just stripped the glass off a board that had more than 1/2 the deck de-laminated. Talk about flex. When I would paddle out, if I snuck over a wave that was close to breaking, it torqued the foam just right and you could literally feel it bending under you. It's a wonder it never actually broke.

    I had a Chinese pop-out for a while. Very stiff. No perceivable flex at all. The glass on it was bizarre. Kind of brittle. Despite being constructed poorly, and having no flex, I have to admit it actually surfed well. Guessing the shape was a copy, but I got used to it having very little flex. Only really noticed it when I would switch back to another regular Poly board. They felt more "alive" to me.

    I wonder how much my weight attributes to me being able to really feel a boards flex. I'm 215-220 lbs, and I can really load up on a turn. I feel like the flex helps slingshot me out of a hard turn. If I were 70lbs lighter, I might not feel it so much.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Oceanside Ca.
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    One important property of a modern surfboard we often overlook is flex. This is now a hot topic in surfboard design. Surfers are starting to understand how surfboard flex affects our surfing and which design characteristics increase flex memory. Shapers everywhere are responding to this increased interest.
    Flex allows your surfboard to build energy through turns when the surfboard's materials change shape. Picture this sequence: You drop into a fast, steep bottom turn. As you do so your surfboard's foam will bend into the turn. This results in more rocker and stored energy. As you come out of this turn and aim for the lip the foam snaps back to its original shape, releasing the stored energy and shooting the surfer out of the turn. A seasoned surfer will turn this burst of energy into acceleration, propelling himself into the next maneuver. While the flex characteristics can help your surfing, creating a surfboard design with flex in mind presents challenges. First, the surfboard must walk the line between flex and strength. Secondly, after repeated compression and expansion, a surfboard's traditional wood stringer will weaken, giving it a "dead" feeling.
    The recent emphasis on flex resulted in questions regarding stringer placement. A board with a center stringer will be stronger and less flexible along the center. However, its rails will flex and wobble which can cause the board to slow. This is called torsion flex. The closer the stringer is to the rail, the more strength or spring it will have along its perimeter which is where the board primarily makes contact with water in turns. It also supports the rail to maintain more of its original rocker shape while the flex comes from the center of the board.
    So now that you know shapers are experimenting with increased flex memory on their new surfboards, perhaps it is time for you to do some experimenting yourself. The idea of springier surfboards accelerating better out of turns sounds great, but can you use it to your advantage?

    I've been working on a few different flex patterns. One is the Incide Blanks with a carbon "Brain" within the board.
    Feels a lot like a wood stringer, but will probably keep its pop longer than a wooden stringer which slowly loses its recoil.

    Also been doing some more of my Dissect series with no stringer but many glue lines to more evenly distribute the flex. Some have a concave deck, some have a high density foam glued within the blank.



    http://barrysnyderdesigns.com

  8. #18
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    Jul 2013
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    York Maine
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    An area that I've thought of for designing a board with flex that is wooden and has a tapered profile is a concept I refer to myself as a foiled torsion box. Yes laminated layers which represent the rail design and the internal framing... Almost identical to Roy's construction method, but instead of laminating the board to the bottom rocker dimensions rather laminated it to the desired deck curvature, then using a foiling jig which drives a straight cut router but, one would be able to thin out the nose, and tail as desired. Once foiled, finish the bottom with anther lamination. Then I think it would flex, but some problems may arise during the router foiling process..

  9. #19
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    Mar 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Taylor View Post
    An area that I've thought of for designing a board with flex that is wooden and has a tapered profile is a concept I refer to myself as a foiled torsion box. Yes laminated layers which represent the rail design and the internal framing... Almost identical to Roy's construction method, but instead of laminating the board to the bottom rocker dimensions rather laminated it to the desired deck curvature, then using a foiling jig which drives a straight cut router but, one would be able to thin out the nose, and tail as desired. Once foiled, finish the bottom with anther lamination. Then I think it would flex, but some problems may arise during the router foiling process..

    serious question

    how many times have you been banned from swaylocks